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BMW Develops Compact Electric Power Transmission System


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Chongqing Feilong Jiangli learns from foreign media that BMW will release a number of pure electric and plug-in hybrid models in the near future. Recently, Stefan Juraschek, vice president of research and development of BMW's electric power transmission system, announced that it would provide the fifth generation electric power transmission system for the new BMW iX3 and i4. The key quality of the system is that the motor, gearbox and power electronics components can form a highly integrated electric drive component. The design of the device is extremely compact and occupies much less space than the three independent parts of the previous model. The total volume of components.

The weight and space problems of electric vehicles are much higher than those of conventional vehicles, because on-board batteries take up a lot of space and increase the body weight. Therefore, in the design of electric power system, it is necessary to ensure that its volume is as compact as possible. In addition, as the speed of popularization and application of electric vehicles is not yet clear, the automobile enterprises must ensure the flexibility of design and provide diesel locomotives for users. BMW's new design concept has actually had a major impact on earlier vehicle manufacturing.

Because the new electric power transmission system is expandable, the equipment can be adjusted to meet different installation space and vehicle requirements. In addition, on-board batteries can match the fifth generation of modular batteries, making the new model suitable for all types of vehicle structures. BMW may be able to equip its electric vehicles with DC/DC chargers, which will greatly shorten the charging time and help BMW's electric vehicles become competitive.

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