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Ford recalls 1.5 million cars for issue that could cause car to quitFord recalls 1.5 million cars for issue that could cause car to quit


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Ford Motor Co said Thursday it will recall nearly 1.5 million cars in North America to address a faulty part that could lead to engine stalls.

The second-largest U.S. automaker said it is calling back 2012 through 2018 model-year Ford Focus cars with 2.0-liter GDI and 2.0-liter GTDI engines for a malfunctioning canister purge valve. Ford said the valve may become stuck open, creating excessive vacuum in the fuel system could deform the car's plastic fuel tank. That, in turn, could cause a malfunction light, or a fuel gauge could give inaccurate readings. Which in turn could lead to a stall while driving and an inability to restart the vehicle, risking a crash.

Ford said it is not aware of any crashes as a result of this condition but said owners should maintain at least a half tank of fuel until the recall is completed.

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