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Hopkins Manufacturing- How to Check Taillight Bulbs


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      It’s been estimated that fraudulent warranty claims cost auto parts stores $600 million every year.
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      link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view The post
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      In the October issue of AMN/Counterman, we talked about the Automotive Sales Council’s
      link hidden, please login to view – an initiative that aims to reduce the sky-high return rate in the automotive aftermarket. Members of the Automotive Sales Council include representatives from KYB, Dorman Products, FDP Brakes, Motorcar Parts of America, MotoRad and Standard Motor Products. The group developed the “Check the Part” campaign to hit home with counter professionals, who are on the front lines of processing parts returns and weeding out warranty abuse.
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      Recently, KYB published a return guide for shocks and struts. If a customer wants to return shocks or struts, KYB offers these five tips to help determine if it’s a valid warranty claim or not.
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