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How To: Replace Taillights on a Late Model RAM 1500


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    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Change the Thermostat in a 2002 to 2008 Dodge Ram 2500
    • By NAPA
      Chase Elliott and No. 9 link hidden, please login to view team qualified ninth for Sunday’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Circuit of The Americas (COTA) As part of the team’s strategy, the 2020 Cup champions pitted in the closing laps of each of the first two stages to hopefully put themselves in a good position to battle for the win In the final stage, Elliott had just made a pass for fifth place when his No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Chevrolet Camaro got loose and he was penalized for exceeding the track limits Despite serving a pass-through penalty, the 28-year-old rebounded to 11th on lap 54 Turning some of the fastest laps of the field, he was close to breaking into the top 10 when he spun and dropped to 19th Elliott rallied to finish 16th and is now ninth in the Cup Series points standings Chase Elliott earned a ninth-place starting position for Sunday’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Circuit of The Americas (COTA), marking the third straight week the No. 9 team qualified inside the top 10. At the start of the 68-lap race, Elliott held his own among the top-10 running order. He lost some positions as the run went on and was 13th when he relayed to the team that his No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 felt stiff on initial load. Elliott advanced to 12th prior to being called to pit road in the closing laps of stage one for four tires and fuel – one of the popular pit strategies among the field. With some teams staying out on the track, Elliott was 18th following the pit stop and that’s where he remained to end the first stage.
      During the stage break, several teams that didn’t short pit the first segment made their way to pit road, putting Elliott in the ninth position to start stage two. Prior to taking the green flag, the 28-year-old driver reported that the NAPA Chevy was tighter through the center of the turns after the initial pit stop. Despite the tight handling condition, Elliott continued to turn laps inside the top 10 during the second stage. He ran as high as seventh and was scored in the eighth spot when crew chief Alan Gustafson radioed for Elliott to come to pit road for four fresh tires and fuel. The team also took the opportunity to reverse an air-pressure adjustment that was made the first pit stop. Elliott returned to the track in 21st and stayed there to take the green-and-white checkered flag on lap 30.
      The 2020 Cup Series champion started the final stage from the 11th position on lap 33 and impressively maneuvered his way to sixth by lap 36. Elliott had just made the pass for fifth when he got loose in turn four and was issued a pass-through penalty for short cutting the course. The team challenged the call, but Elliott was ultimately forced to serve the penalty on lap 40. After leaving pit road, Elliott was scored 22nd but quickly made up ground on his competitors. Green flag pit stops got under way on lap 44 with the No. 9 team making its on lap 47. Following the four-tire pit stop, Elliott was 26th in the running order but was consistently turning some of the fastest laps of the field. The Dawsonville, Georgia, native was up to 20th on lap 50 and advanced to 15th just one lap later as green-flag stops continued. Elliott was up to 11th and had his sights set on a top-10 finish when he got loose and spun. The driver of the No. 9 was able to continue but the setback dropped him to 19th. Refusing to give up, Elliott fought hard to regain track position. He picked up a few spots and the team was hopeful for a late-race caution, but it never came. When the checkered flag waved, Elliott and the No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts crew was scored with a 16th-place finish. 
      Elliott leaves COTA ninth in the Cup Series points standings, just 47 markers behind the leader.
      Next Race: Sunday, March 31, Richmond Raceway
      How to Watch or Listen: 7:00 p.m. ET on FOX, MRN or SiriusXM
      Start / Finish: 9 / 16
      Points Standing / Total: 9th / 173 pts. (-47)
      NAPA: 
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      Chase Elliott:  link hidden, please login to view
      Hendrick Motorsports:  link hidden, please login to view
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    • By NAPA
      Christian Eckes put on a furious rally on an overtime restart to capture an eighth-place finish on Saturday afternoon at Circuit of the Americas (COTA). The driver of the No. 19
      link hidden, please login to view Chevrolet Silverado RST had an eventful, up-and-down afternoon but showcased his resilience by rebounding from two penalties to record his second top-10 result at COTA. After qualifying 10th on Friday afternoon, Eckes was forced to start at the tail of the field after the NAPA Auto Care team changed transmissions before the race. The New Yorker was undeterred by starting shotgun and rocketed to 14th on the opening lap. An early caution on lap three helped Eckes continue his rapid run to the front on a lap six restart when he cracked the top 10. He maintained his top-five position at the end of Stage 1 on lap 12 to collect six points in fifth position.
      Crew chief Charles Denike brought Eckes to pit road for four tires, fuel, and a small adjustment under the first stage caution. Eckes restarted 11th on lap 15 as several trucks stayed on track. He immediately climbed into fifth on lap 18 and took advantage of an impending caution to pit on lap 21 before the yellow flag flew. However, Eckes was nabbed with a penalty for exceeding track limits and was sent to the tail of the field. He restarted 23rd on lap 24 and hustled his way to close Stage 2 in 12th on lap 26.
      During the second stage caution, Eckes stayed on track to inherit track position and restarted eighth on lap 29. While running sixth on lap 30, Eckes incurred another track limit violation and ran 26th after serving the penalty under green. With the aid of a caution on lap 38, he restarted 10th on lap 40, but spun at the top of Turn 1 on lap 41. Denike and the NAPA Auto Care team gave Eckes four tires for the two-lap overtime as he restarted 22nd on lap 45 with two laps to go. As the OT green flag dropped, Eckes went on an all-out rampage, slicing through the field in the final two laps to take the checkered flag in eighth position.
      “We came from the back at least four times today and felt like we were a top-three truck,” Eckes said. “Our NAPA Auto Care Chevrolet was pretty well balanced but just had too many mistakes on my part. Our team did a great job responding from it to get back to eighth at the end.”
      Start / Finish: 10 / 8
      Points Standing / Total: 6th / 177 pts. (-30)
      Next Race: Friday, April 15, Martinsville Speedway
      How to Watch or Listen: FS1, MRN or SiriusXM
      NAPA: 
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      Bill McAnally Racing / McAnally-Hilgemann Racing:  link hidden, please login to view The post
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    • By NAPA
      Honestly,
      link hidden, please login to view are rarely a topic of discussion around automotive maintenance until something goes wrong. A torn CV boot seems like a minor issue at first, but if the situation is not remedied quickly, more damage will occur. A CV boot keeps lubricating grease from escaping the spinning link hidden, please login to view. Without grease, the CV joint will wear out rapidly. CV boots also protect the CV joint from water, dirt and road debris. For an often-forgotten replacement part, the CV boot performs a pretty critical job. For even more technical insight, check out “ link hidden, please login to view” CV boots aren’t just for front-wheel-drive vehicles either. Any vehicle design that must transmit power to a wheel, while also allowing for suspension movement, might utilize a CV joint. For example, a late-model, rear-wheel-drive
      link hidden, please login to view has an independent rear suspension and two CV axles, each with two CV boots. A late-model, front-wheel-drive link hidden, please login to view also has two CV axles and four CV boots. But, in comparison, an all-wheel-drive link hidden, please login to view has four CV axles and a total of eight CV boots.  Is It Possible Fix a CV Boot?
      If you’re searching for a how-to guide on replacing a damaged CV boot, you came to the right place. Let’s walk through a CV boot replacement with the help of some NAPA expertise. Keep in mind, a CV axle boot replacement is only for
      link hidden, please login to view that are still in good shape. If your CV axle is clicking or the CV boot was damaged and leaking grease for an extended length of time, you need to replace the entire CV axle.  Installing a new CV boot and applying
      link hidden, please login to view won’t fix an already damaged CV joint. Also, the labor to just replace a CV boot is nearly the same or greater than replacing the entire CV axle assembly. If the link hidden, please login to view costs as much as a new or rebuilt CV axle, the smart choice is to replace the entire CV axle. How Long Does It Take to Replace a CV Boot?
      The time it takes for CV axle boot replacement varies by vehicle. Most of the labor time involves removing the CV axle from the vehicle. Budget at least an hour for the job if the CV axle is easy to remove or up to three hours if the vehicle is complicated. Cleaning the CV joint can take another 30 minutes as well. 
      How to Replace a CV Boot
      A typical
      link hidden, please login to view includes a new CV boot, two CV boot clamps and grease. Replacing a CV boot requires lifting the vehicle off the ground for easier access to the underside. A repair shop or well-outfitted home mechanic will utilize a vehicle lift, while a DIYer can use something as simple as sturdy link hidden, please login to view. Never use a floor jack to support a vehicle, as they can suddenly fail.  Lift the vehicle off the ground. Use a wheel chock to prevent any wheels on the ground from rolling. Remove the wheel on the axle that needs repaired. Refer to a repair manual for what steps to follow to access the CV axle. You will likely need to remove the brakes and detach steering and/or suspension components, as well as the axle nut. Remove the CV axle from the vehicle and place it on a workbench with plenty of working space. Cut off the failed rubber CV boot. The metal CV boot clamps will likely require a pair of link hidden, please login to view. Due to the potential mess caused by the CV joint grease, we recommend wearing a pair of disposable work gloves for this step. Refer to your repair manual for how to remove the CV joint from the axle shaft. Note that inner and outer CV joints are possibly different and might require distinct methods of disassembly. Clean the axle shaft to remove any old grease. Use a link hidden, please login to view to clean the CV joint. Let the CV joint dry thoroughly. If using non-split CV boot clamps, slide them over the axle shaft now. Slide the new CV boot onto the axle shaft, taking care to orient it correctly. The large cone opening should face the CV joint. You may need to use a small amount of silicone lubricant to help move the boot along the axle shaft.  Refer to your repair manual to link hidden, please login to view using the correct specified grease. Refer to your repair manual to reinstall the CV joint onto the end of the axle shaft. Slide the CV boot over the CV joint, making sure it is seated evenly. Using the link hidden, please login to view, tighten both CV boot clamps. Reinstall the CV axle along with any components that were removed to access the CV axle. Pay attention to torque specifications during reassembly. Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts to the correct specifications.  Lower the vehicle back to the ground.  How Much Does It Cost to Replace a CV Boot?
      CV boot replacement cost can range from $300 to $900 depending on the vehicle. It is wise to price out replacement of the entire CV axle as well. In some cases, it is smarter to spend a little more money to replace the entire CV axle rather than spend time changing just a CV boot. Check out the
      link hidden, please login to view for a better estimate of what this repair would cost for your vehicle (if applicable). Now that you know the typical steps of how to replace a CV boot, you can decide if this repair is something you can tackle yourself. Your local NAPA Auto Parts store can help you find the right CV axle boot repair kit for your application. You can also shop NAPAonline for
      link hidden, please login to view on more than 160,000 items! Don’t feel like doing it yourself or don’t have the time? The link hidden, please login to view at your local link hidden, please login to view have you covered with more than 17,000 locations nationwide. Photo courtesy of
      link hidden, please login to view. The post
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    • By Counterman
      NRS Brakes has added premium galvanized brake-pad kits for 2022-2024 Ram ProMaster covering 1.2 million vehicles, including ambulances.
      The brake kits also include abutment hardware and caliper-piston cushions.
      “Canadian-made Premium Galvanized Brake Pads by NRS Brakes feature technology that you can see,” the company said in a news release. “Galvanized steel incorporates PACE-award-winning, patented NRS mechanical fusion technology. The result is the world’s quietest, safest and longest-lasting brake pads. Galvanized steel that outlasts the friction, ensuring it won’t fail as a result of corrosion-material delamination from the backing plate, giving you a license to feel safe.”
      NRS Brakes feature no glue, no paint and no toxins, NRS noted.
      All galvanized brake pads use OE-specified technology, according to the company.
      PART #AXLE POSITIONAPPLICATIONSNS2467REARRam ProMaster 1500 (2022-2024);
      ProMaster 2500 (2022-2024);
      ProMaster 3500 (2022-2024) The post
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