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Shop AutoPartsToys.com for all Your Car, Truck and SUV Accessories at Direct Factory Warehouse Pricing

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Benefits you may don’t know about Tonneau Cover


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If you are a truck owner but don't have one Tonneau cover, it’s time to consider one, because there are numerous benefits to getting your truck bed covered.

Save gas and save money

Importantly, the Tonneau cover can improve gas mileage due to a more streamlined aerodynamic structure, which brings the reduction in air drag when driving, thus increasing the gas mileage. The research finds that you can save more than 12% of gas with Tonneau covers. 

gas_saving.jpg

Increased Security

Normally, leaving the personal items in the truck in open will leave you vulnerable to theft, and the exposed material, equipment, toolboxes, etc. can be taken away from your truck. This is where Tonneau covers come in handy, and they can provide the greatest value in safeguarding your personal items.

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with lock can be an added layer of security, fully protecting the item from falling down the ground when driving.

Create a cool look

With a sleek design, the Tonneau cover brings your vehicle an elegant and robust appearance, making it look more pleasing and aesthetic to your eye.

look1.jpg

Maintain Resale Value

Tonneau cover also adds an additional value to your pickup truck and your truck’s resale value will be remained by reducing any potential damage to the truck bed.

That’s why Tonneau covers always be considered as the most profitable investment for truck owners.

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