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TOP 10 BEST NOCO Genius Boost JUMP STARTERS BATTERY CHARGERS


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Best NOCO GB40 Boost Jump Starter 

Our motive is to show you actual product information which is relay on fact and figures. 

The
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is a top best and cheap compact, yet powerful 1000 Amp lithium-ion jump starter that deliver 7000 Joules of starting power. Its patented safety technology features spark proof technology and reverse polarity protection making it safe for anyone. Which allow it to safely connect to any battery An ultra-bright 100 lumen LED flashlight with 7 light modes, including SOS and Emergency Strobe Recharge your personal devices on the go, like smartphones, tablets, e-watches and more – up to 4 smartphone recharges Designed for gas engines up to 6 Liters and diesel engines up to 3 Liters Includes GB40 jump starter, 40-inch USB cable, 12V car charger, drawstring storage e bag, and 1-year limited warranty.

About GB40.
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is an ultra-compact and portable lithium-ion jump starter for cars, boats, motorcycles, ATVs, lawn mowers, RVs, tractors, trucks and more. It’s extremely safe for anyone to use. It features spark proof technology and reverse polarity protection. The GB40 can instantly jump start most single battery applications, up to 20 times on a single charge. The GB40 is also equipped with a USB battery pack and LED flashlight, making it the ultimate emergency tool.

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         A lithium battery jump starter rated at 1,000 Amps (7,000 Joules3S)

·         Spark-proof connections and reverse polarity protection

·         

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, and more

·         100 lumen LED flashlight with multiple modes, including SOS

·         Jump starts gas engines up to 6 liters, and diesel up to 3 liters

·         Provides up to 20 jump starts on a single charge.

Specifications

·         Starting Current: 1,000 Amps Peak

·         Joules 3S Rating: 7,000 J3S

·         Battery Types: 12 Volt Lead-Acid Batteries

·         Internal Battery: 24 Watt-Hour Lithium Ion

·         USB Output: 2.1 Amps

·         USB Input: 2.1 Amps

·         Gas Engine Rating: 6.0 Liters

·         Diesel Engine Rating: 3.0 Liters

·         LED Flashlight: 100 Lumens

 

Connecting to the Battery.

Before connecting to the battery, verify that you have a 12-
volt lead-acid battery. The GB40 is not suitable for any other
type of battery. Identify the correct polarity of the battery
terminals on the battery. The positive battery terminal is
typically marked by these letters or symbol (POS,P,+).
The negative battery terminal is typically marked by these
letters or symbol (NEG,N,-). Do not make any connections
to the carburetor, fuel lines, or thin, sheet metal parts. The
below instructions are for a negative ground system (most
common). If your vehicle is a positive ground system (very
uncommon), follow the below instructions in reverse order.

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