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Trying to identify


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      It’s in every American’s blood to achieve more, do better, strive. (Well, most Americans. Everyone has that one cousin who doesn’t do a whole lot.)
      But in this hyper-aware, hyper-competitive world in which we live, I’d like everyone to do one, huge thing: less. Of everything.
      What? Yes, that’s right, less.
      You know that phrase you often hear when meeting new people and exchanging business cards, “I’m a jack of all trades, master of none?” That’s not a good thing. And I’m not sure why we hear it so much. I think it’s meant as a badge of honor. Or maybe it’s meant to be a sign of humility. But that person needs to listen to his or her own words and act on them.
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      Source: http://www.counterman.com/stop-trying-to-do-too-much-and-watch-your-sales-improve/
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